PCF May Fauxdown – Events 1 & 2

Events 1 & 2

 

RX’d
For Time:
50 Clean-and-Jerk (135/85)
10/6 Rope Climb (15′)
50 Synchro Burpee Over the Bar
Scaled
For Time:
50 Clean-and-Jerk (95/65)
10/6 Rope Climb (10′)
35 Synchro Burpee Over the Bar


Post times to comments.

 

Notes:
* Event 1: Time to complete clean-and-jerks. Event 2: Time to complete all work. *13:00 Cap. One partner working at a time on barbell and rope climb. Athletes must be on the floor simultaneously during burpees. Share the work as needed.

18.2 @ Potomac – Running Heats

All, due to the equipment and space logistics of 18.2, we will be running continuous heats throughout the morning at Potomac tomorrow.  Coach Aaron will conduct a warm-up at the start of the 0830 class, but after that athletes will be encouraged to warm-up and mobilize on their own. Once ready and warmed up, jump into the next available Heat. Be sure to sign in to which ever class is in progress when you arrive.

Every two heats or so, Coach Aaron will stop to brief the workout and the standards to ensure athletes and judges are up to speed. Please read through the movement standards ahead of time, this will greatly speed things along and keep classes flowing.

General flow of the morning will look something like this:

  • 0830: Brief Warm-up
  • 0845: 18.2 Workout Brief
  • 0855-1130:
    • Heat 1
    • Heat 2
    • 18.2 Workout Brief
    • Heat 3
    • Heat 4
    • 18.2 Workout Brief
    • Heat 5
    • Heat 6
    • 18.2 Workout Brief
    • … continuing until 1130

Again, after the 0830 warm-up, athletes are encouraged to come in and warm-up on their own, then jump into an available heat when ready. Coach Aaron will have a suggested warm-up available. Good luck!

 

Get to Know Your Captains – Shanlynn Bias

 

Shanlynn Bias | Captain, Team Potomac Liberty

What is something most PCF’ers don’t know about you? A secret talent? An embarrassing story?
I unknowingly was bit by a tick carrying Lyme Disease as a kid. I woke up one day shortly after and half my face was paralyzed/drooping. Back then I was never not joking around (still true), so my mom thought I was somehow consciously making my face that way. When my dad picked me up from school later on, he noticed something was truly wrong and brought me to the hospital. I was on steroids and had to have my eye taped shut to sleep for a couple weeks.

How/when did you get started with CrossFit? What has made you stick around?
I played collegiate basketball so for a good portion of the first 22 years of my life I never had to work out alone. During grad school I tried to work out at a Planet Fitness, but it wasn’t cutting it. One of my classmates found a free foundations program at the nearby box so we tried it and joined shortly after. That was in July of 2015. I was fortunate to join a box with wonderful community; knowledgeable coaches that were willing to help with anything/everything and members that were welcoming and inspirational. I had missed the camaraderie and structure. I’m in it for the long-haul now!

What has your past experience with The Open been like?
I’ve competed in two Opens so far and I’ve only come close to passing out twice. In all seriousness, the Open has been a great experience. Athletes are able to try movements they might not see in their box’s usual programming and also be a part of a huge community that curses Dave Castro for being the actual devil. If finding out where you rank amongst the athletes in your area isn’t your thing, that’s totally fine! That’s not the main goal for many athletes. The Open somehow creates this exhilarating/competitive atmosphere over the course of 5 weeks that is hard to match. Everyone really should do it! It’s a great time.

So, you’ve been named captain (nice work!) of one of the PCF Intramural Open Teams… what does that mean to you?
I have to be honest, I was a little surprised. I haven’t been a member at PCF for very long, but I can genuinely say I’ve had the best couple of months here. I’m excited and honored!

What are you looking forward to most about this year’s Open/Intramural Open?
Trying to guess what the workout is using Dave’s random clues that never actually help or makes sense and the excitement of Thursday night announcements.

For people that have never done the Open before and are maybe on the fence, what would you tell them?
You don’t have to be an athlete that RX’s workouts on a daily basis. You don’t even have to be an athlete that RX’s any workouts. The Open is a great way to test your abilities and have a fun time doing it! Everyone suffers together, everyone surprises themselves, everyone can do it.

Give us some cold, hard numbers: What is your Fran/Helen/Grace time? 1RM Deadlift? Olympic total? 2K time? Pick some common CrossFit Benchmarks and let us know where you are!
Jackie – 9:23
Karen – 6:51
Cindy – 14 + 1
Back squat – 230 (NEW PR BABYBABYYY)
Deadlift – 290
Clean – 175

What is your favorite CrossFit movement? What is your least favorite?
Favorite: BACK SQUAT – bootywerk!
Least favorite: Squat snatch, more out of fear than anything. It’s definitely something to work on.

January Nutrition Challenge – Fitness Test

RX’d
In 12 Minutes:
50/40 Calorie Row, then
AMRAP in Remaining Time
12 DB Front Rack Lunge (45/30)
12 Burpee Over the Rower

6 DB Push Press (45/30)

Level II
In 12 Minutes:
50/40 Calorie Row, then
AMRAP in Remaining Time
12 DB Front Rack Lunge (35/25)
12 Burpee Over the Rower
6 DB Push Press (35/25)
Level I
In 12 Minutes:
40/30 Calorie Row, then
AMRAP in Remaining Time
12 DB Front Rack Lunge (30/15)
6 DB Push Press (30/15)

Post rounds plus reps to comments. Please click here to sign up to bring some food to the potluck, going down afterwards!

 

Goal-Setting

 

The following is a chapter from our upcoming e-Book, “21st Century Athletics: The First Wave of Adaptation.” 

Goal-Setting

By Colin Farrell

One of the most common and oft-used goal-setting templates is the SMART Goal. It’s a helpful template to be aware of. Goals should be:

Specific

Measurable

Achievable

Realistic

Timely

Goal-setting is extremely important and can be exciting. Committing goals to writing, somehow, makes them just a little bit more real. Laying out a plan to achieve them can add an extra level of commitment.  Filling out the SMART template is a great starting point. However, there are two important aspects of being successful left out of the SMART template: passion and execution.

Gabriele Oettingen is Professor of Psychology at New York University and focuses a great deal of her time and attention on how people think about their futures. In her book, “Rethinking Positive Thinking”, she outlines another method of not just setting goals but achieving them, WOOP.  Ben Bergeron is owner of CrossFit New England and a leader in world of CrossFit coaching. He has taken Oettingen’s method and built on it a bit further to develop the WHOOPIE template for setting and achieving goals:

Wishing and Hoping

Outcome

Obstacle

Plan

Identify

Execution

Wishing and Hoping. One of the main issues with the SMART template is that it is very sterile, dry, and impersonal. Ensuring the objectives are achievable and realistic often means athletes sell themselves short so as to guarantee their goals can most assuredly be met.  If an athlete is at a 6, and sets a goal to become a 10, but he or she only achieves an 8 or 9… is that a failure through and through? Absolutely not. Progress was made and the individual probably learned a good deal about himself or herself along the way, and potentially even knows how to get to a 10 from where they now are.  If an athlete truly wishes and hopes they can achieve a specific goal, it is an indicator they want it and are passionate about it. It can become difficult to be passionate about working towards and achieving a goal that is flatly and resoundingly achievable.

Outcome. What would it look like if you achieve the goal? How does it feel? How do you celebrate? Who is there with you when you have accomplished the goal? What are you wearing, where are you, what’s going through your head? Visualize every aspect of the moment the goal is achieved. Individuals need to be excited about the achievement of the goal. If you, the athlete, cannot get excited about this aspect of WHOOPIE, the goal needs to be re-evaluated or the reason why the goal is being set (more on that later) needs to be re-visted.

Obstacles. “No battle plan ever survives first contact with the enemy.” So wrote Field Marshal Helmuth von Moltke in the mid-19th century. The importance of determining any and all obstacles on the path to achieving one’s goal cannot be overstated. Anticipate roadblocks and map out how to get around–or over–them. Knowing the enemy is imperative. You live in Maine, it’s January, but you have to go for a training run to get ready for Spartan Sprint you have coming up; how are you going to ensure you don’t roll over and get an extra hour of sleep in your warm, comfy bed? Your toddlers were up all night and you’ve got a big project at work; how will you find the time and energy to get to the gym to work on pull-up progressions? You pushed it a little too hard deadlifting yesterday and your back doesn’t feel great; what are you going to do to further your fitness while still giving your body the attention it needs? You have to travel for work every third week, often changing time zones multiple times in a single five-day stretch; how do optimize your health and fitness when the world seems to conspire against you?

Plan. Write out the process. Athletes should be as detailed as is possible, while still allowing for some flexibility (see “Obstacles”, above). Meeting with a coach to lay out a plan is immeasurably helpful when seeking to achieve fitness, nutrition, and health goals. Start with a big idea, and continuously break it down into actionable items with daily, weekly, and monthly checkpoints. Set in place actionable items that are 100% within your control. One of Steven Covey’s Seven Habits is to “sharpen the saw.” This can be interpreted similarly as “work smarter, not harder.” If an athlete set out a goal to be twice as fit next year as they were this year, they may simply decide to go to the gym twice as often.  While this may (though it is not likely) work, truly effective people will find ways to be more efficient, not just harder working. Again, coaches and mentors are an invaluable resource in establishing how to maximize output without putting in absurd and intrusive numbers of hours in pursuit of a goal.

Identify. “When it is 5:00am, 12 degrees outside, and I have a long day of work ahead of me, I am the kind of person that will still get out of bed to ensure I get my training run in.” “When my twin toddlers were up all night last night, and had to go into the office early to get a jump start on a project, I am the kind of person that will still go to the gym before heading home for dinner.” “When my low back is killing me from deadlifting a little too much earlier this week, I am the kind of person that will still get to the gym and ask a coach how to work around the issue, and I am the kind of person that will use some time off to dial in my nutrition.”  Athletes that identify as the kind of person that works hard, doesn’t make excuses, and is tenacious in pursuit of objectives will find more success than those that focus their attention on the task at hand. Focus your attention on being the kind of person that will complete tasks despite everything.

Execute. You have a dream, you’ve visualized how incredible the outcome will be. You’ve anticipated potential problems and setbacks along the way, laid out a plan, identified as the kind of athlete that sets and achieves goals.

Now go do it.

Tuesday 171219

RX’d
Push Press 5x3x70%
 
4 Rounds for Reps
AMRAP in 2 Minutes
20 Ring Dip, then
Max Calorie Row
Rest 1 Minute b/t Rounds
Level II
Push Press 5-5-4-4-3-3-3-3-3
 
4 Rounds for Reps
AMRAP in 2 Minutes
15 Assisted Ring Dip, then
Max Calorie Row
Rest 1 Minute b/t Rounds
Level I
Push Press 5-5-4-4-3-3-3-3-3
 
4 Rounds for Reps
AMRAP in 2 Minutes
15 Assisted Ring Dip, then
Max Calorie Row
Rest 1 Minute b/t Rounds

Post total calories to comments.

What is The Open?

 

What is The Open?

By Colin Farrell

The CrossFit Games Open, commonly referred to as just “The Open”, is a 5-week long, worldwide CrossFit competition whose purpose is to test the fitness of participating athletes. For 99.9% of us, our competition season ends after Week 5. For the top few women, men, and teams in their geographic region, The Open serves as the qualifying round before making it to Regionals, and for the fittest among them, subsequently to the CrossFit Games.

The Open is, reportedly, the most egalitarian sporting event on Earth. It costs only $20 to participate (a tiny amount when compared to local fitness competition, Spartan Races, Tough Mudders, or even your local half marathon or 10k), and you can compete in your own gym, or even at your home so long as you have the necessary equipment. In its inaugural year, roughly 20,000 athletes signed up. In 2017, that number had grown to nearly a half million.

The Open usually starts in late February and runs through March. Each week during the competition, on Thursday night, CrossFit Headquarters announces the workout. Athletes around the world have until Monday night to complete the workout and submit their scores online. At Potomac CrossFit, the Open workout is programmed for Saturday during each week of the Open. At Patriot CrossFit, it is programmed for Fridays throughout the 5 weeks. Participating athletes will have a judge and scorecard to verify each repetition was completed properly (at the correct weight, with the specified range of motion, etc.) and their scores will be validated by the Head Coach from each gym.

If inclined to do so, athletes may repeat a workout for a better score. As long as their score is submitted before the deadline each Monday night.

At the end of the 5 weeks, athletes may take a look at the leaderboard to see how they did compared to their results in previous years, compared to athletes in their gym, age bracket, geographic location, and even see where they stack up in the world.

The Open is a great time to test your fitness and push yourself. It is a great time to push a little bit outside your normal comfort zone. Every year, people PR major lifts during the Open, someone will nail double-unders for the first time, get their first muscle-up, or complete a box jump at a height they never dreamed imaginable.

The Open is a ton of fun. Registration opens at games.crossfit.com on 11 January. Are you in?

 

Further Reading and Viewing

The CrossFit Games website

What is The Open?

Greg Glassman On The Open, Part I and Part II

Live Announcement of 17.1

“Thank you, Dan”

Thanksgiving Schedule + Holiday Throwdown At Capacity

  • Holiday Throwdown Registration At Capacity:  Thanks to the 23 teams that have registered! We are now closing registration. Additional teams can add themselves to the waitlist by going here. We invite you to come cheer on all 69 athletes participating!
  • Holiday Potluck Party after Throwdown: Please join us for a festive PCF celebration immediately following the Throwdown on 12/8 at 6:30 at Potomac. Bring whatever delicious treat you’d like to bring, we’ll supply the beer.
  • Here’s our Thanksgiving Schedule for both locations. Please note Patriot will be open for two late morning classes on Thanksgiving Thursday, 11/23. Potomac will be closed.
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